How to Fly a Trainer Kite: Basics

Basic Flying Steps with a Trainer kite:

First pick out a good field or beach to fly at. Remember that if there are trees or buildings between you and the wind, the kite will not fly correctly. A tiny field in the middle of the town does not sometimes work best unless there’s a good tunnel effect for the wind to come thru. Frozen lakes work wonderful, but you’ll need to stroll a little way into the center. Place sand on the trailing edge so the kite does not blow away, or have an helper hold the back of the kite with the leading edge facing up into the wind ( make sure they don’t let go ). Unwind the lines from the bar, walking into the wind, and then walk between them to the kite to make certain there are no knots or twists previous to launch.

Return to the bar and attach your safety leash if necessary. Pull strongly on the bar and the kite will launch. Flying a trainer kite is just like riding a bike ; pull left and the kite will turn left, pull right and the kite will turn right. Wherever the leading edge is pointed ( like the front wheel of your bicycle ) is where the kite will go. You can crash your trainer kite. Just walk over and set it back up for re-launch. Try to not crash it at once down wind as it is feasible to blow seams out of a kite if crashed immediately into the ground at fifty miles an hour.

Wind is like driving on a street; sometimes it’s smooth and sometimes it’s bumpy. Even little 2.5 trainer kites develop lots of power. Most 3.5 Meter and larger sized kites will  permit a 200lb person to leap 6-10 feet forward when the winds are over 17mph.

If you have somebody helping you launch the trainer kite, make sure they move right after launching. Also, be nice and share your kite with them.

It takes the majority anywhere from hour to three hours to be realy learn how to fly a trainer kite proficiently. Do not expect to be a expert flier in just a few minutes.

All kites will still fly precisely the same even with a twist in their lines. To untwist the lines, either fly a complete loop in the other direction, or spin your body quickly around. Most kites can fly with two or 3 loops before the lines start to bind up.